Santa Monica, CA: Eames Office

Visit: The Eames Office has no formal archivist. We met with David Hertsgaard, who assists with their long-term goal of organizing, cataloging and data-basing their collection, and also researches, processes and supplies images for a variety of needs. David is very knowledgeable about thier history and their archival holdings.

The bulk of the Eames archives are at the Library of Congress,  (The entire two-dimensional archives of the Office of Charles and Ray Eames from their studio at 901 Washington Blvd in Venice California - estimated at about 750,000 items). Eames Office has perhaps 30,000 items.  Most three-dimensional prototypes and furniture from The Office of Charles and Ray Eames at 901 Washington Blvd are at the Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany–some however were retained by the Eames family and are in the Eames Office collection.

Their image collection consists of duplicates from the Office of Charles and Ray Eames and a few duplicates from the LoC. The image library maintained by the Eames Office is for research, exhibitions, permissions and licensing. They also have some published materials and ephemera from the Office of Charles and Ray Eames, some prototypes and production models, exhibition pieces, an extensive toy collection, oral histories, paintings, drawings and a limited group of personal letters.The Eames Office has published six volumes of Eames films to DVD and VHS.  Beyond these published volumes they have a few unpublished films they can share in Santa Monica.  Again, the Library of Congress has the entire film collection. The curator of the Eames Collection at LoC is Ford Peatross

They have established contact points for both images and archives, at these emails:

photo@eamesoffice.com
archive@eamesoffice.com

Eames Demetrios and Carla Hartman are children of Lucia Eames and staff members of the Eames Office.They are also available to help with research inquiries.

Discoveries: They still have some of the wooden leg splints which were originally produced by the office during WWII, and which were designed using Charles Eames own leg. Many of the splints they have (and they do sell them) are in the original wrapping papers.